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2019-2020 Community Report

Quantifying Early Seedling Traits In Threatened High-Elevation Conifer Species To Support Ecological Restoration

High-elevation forests provide essential services to ecological and anthropogenic communities. Because they occupy environments near or beyond the physiological tolerances of other tree species, they provide irreplaceable wildlife habitat and stabilize snowpack, serving as the primary Great Basin water source. (full article)

Economic impacts of potential sage grouse habitat designation in Elko County Nevada

The Elko County Range Livestock Sector may be impacted changes in public land management policies such as the designation of sage grouse habitat. Public land management policy issues such as the potential designation of the sage grouse as an endangered species or reductions in grazing permits because of drought will impact the economic viability of the Elko County range livestock industry.  (full article)

Characterizing The Shifting Role Of Wildfire In Dryland Ecosystem And Watershed Processes

Climate change and human actions, such as fire suppression, have altered fuel characteristics and fire regimes in dryland systems like the Great Basin. Wildfire activity has also increased in response to non-native plant invasions and climate-driven shifts in plant cover. (full article)

Identification Of Climate-Resilient Traits And Lineages For Singleleaf Pinyon Pine

Pinyon-juniper woodlands occupy over 100 million acres of the western United States and are among the most important vegetation types occurring in the dryland ecosystems of the Intermountain West.  (full article)

Virtual Fencing For Increased Livestock Management Flexibility On Nevada Rangelands

Virtual fencing systems (VF) hold considerable promise as tools to help land and livestock managers achieve desired livestock distribution on rangelands contributing to sustainable rangeland management. (full article)

An Ecological Assessment For Management Of Wild Horses On Western Public Lands

The goal of the 1971 Wild Horse and Burro Act is to “maintain a thriving natural ecological balance on the public lands,” yet wild horse abundance is an ongoing management challenge on western public lands. In the arid western states of Utah, Nevada, and Wyoming, almost 90% of horse populations currently exceed the Appropriate Management Level (AML). Gathers, removals, contraception, and adoptions have been inadequate to keep pace with the 15%-20% yearly herd growth rates, making this goal difficult to achieve.  (full article)

Developmental And Environmental Limitations in Teff Photosynthesis

Future warmer and drier growing environments are expected to have long-term negative impacts on agricultural productivity, resulting in decreased certainty for food security. Tef (Eragrostis tef)  is a warm season, C4-photosynthesis grass that is gaining popularity in the U.S. as a high-quality forage, fodder, and highly nutritious, gluten-free grain. (full article)

Evaluation Of Production Environments On Grain Sorghum And Barley During Craft Malting And Brewing

Drought, heat, and elevated nighttime temperatures are major abiotic stresses impacting the grain quality of cereal crops around the world. These stresses are being exacerbated by climate change in countries where malting and brewing of grain crops are integral to local culture and identity, yet their impacts on the malting and brewing qualities of grain are poorly understood. (full article)

Development Of Precision Agricultural Production Methods For Sorghum Yield And Quality Using Variable-Rate Irrigation

The natural drought tolerance of sorghum makes it a more sustainable grain option than maize for food, feed, alcoholic beverages, and biofuels end uses. Nevada producers have been growing older varieties of forage-type sorghum for many years, but grain sorghum is emerging as a high-value domestic crop that can fill profitable specialty markets for non-GMO, gluten-free food, snacks, and craft brewing and distilling. (full article)